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  • “Post Fukushima —A conversation between Atsunobu Katagiri and Kazuma Obara” (TBC)

Atsunobu Katagiri & Kazuma Obara片桐功敦 & 小原一真

“Post Fukushima —A conversation between Atsunobu Katagiri and Kazuma Obara” (TBC)

Atsunobu Katagiri

Atsunobu Katagiri

Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, 2013

Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, 2013

Atsunobu Katagiri, Sacrifice, 2013

Born 1973 in Osaka. Flower artist. In 1997, at the age of twenty-four, he became grand master of the Misasagi School of ikebanalong established in Sakai, Osaka. Known for his broad command of many styles from traditional to contemporary as well as for his collaborations with artists in other fields.
In September 2013, two and a half years after the Tohoku Earthquake-Nuclear Disaster, Katagiri was invited to make an ikebanaarrangement using a rare indigenous mizu-aoi pondweed blossom designated a class 2 endangered species by the Ministry of the Environment a that had revived in the wake of the tsunami, Katagiri decided to settle in Minami Soma, Fukushima. Despite all the vestigal damage, he began to arrange flowers in keeping with the living conditions that formerly prevailed there.
“The sadness of missing what should be there and the hope to go on living, the beautiful flowers gave me a sense of the inner being of living things after the disaster. Looking back on it now, what I did was perhaps my attempt at prayer for the defiled land and lost lives,” says Katagiri.

Kazuma Obara

Kazuma Obara

Kazuma Obara, Waves and Home 2011–2019 © Kazuma Obara

Kazuma Obara, Waves and Home 2011–2019 © Kazuma Obara

Kazuma Obara, Waves and Home 2011–2019 © Kazuma Obara

Photojournalist, born 1985 in Iwate. Graduated in photojournalism from University of the Arts, London. Obara quit his job in finance after the March 2011 Tohoku Earthquake-Tsunami-Nuclear Disaster to document the efforts of nuclear power workers, then signed on as local hire to photograph the crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi Power Plant from the inside, culminating in the publication Reset: Beyond Fukushima (Zürich: Lars Müller Publishers, 2012).
Obara has published many other powerful exposés including Silent Histories (2014), a history of Japanese child victims of indiscriminate World War II bombings—selected as a Time magazine Best Photo Book—and Exposure (2017), a photoessay shot on expired film focused on an Ukranian woman named Maria, who has suffered from radiation-related thyroid disease for thirty years despite having been born after the Chernobyl nuclear accident.
He has received numerous international awards, as well as a grant from the French International Photoreporter Festival toward a current project about victims of Bikini Atoll hydrogen bomb tests. For KYOTOGRAPHIE 2020, Obara will exhibit a new series, titled 'Waves and Home’. This ongoing work is about Fukushima and its inhabitants following Tohoku Earthquake-Tsunami-Nuclear Disaster.

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