Exhibitions

07

Masahisa Fukase深瀬 昌久

PLAY

Kondaya Genbei Chikuin-no-Ma
10:00 – 18:00|Closed day: Tuesdays(except for 5/1)

* The door is closed 30 minutes before.
* Admission free till junior high school age.
* Disabled people with one companion are free upon presenting Disabled Person’s Handbook or an equivalent form of government issued identification.

Admission Fee: ¥1000 / Students(University, High school, Vocational) ¥800

Masahisa Fukase, A GAME, 1983 © Masahisa Fukase Archives​, courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery​ in London

Masahisa Fukase, RAVENS: Noctambulant Flight, 1980 © Masahisa Fukase Archives​, courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery​ in London

Masahisa Fukase, BUKUBUKU​, 1991 © Masahisa Fukase Archives​, courtesy of Michael Hoppen Gallery​ in London

Masahisa Fukase (b. 1934, Bifuka, Hokkaido) was one of Japan’s leading photographers, whose powerful expressions continue to inspire new generations even after a crippling accident in 1992 and his subsequent death in 2012. His works posing universal questions – ‘Who am I?’ ‘What is photography?’ – have garnered considerable international attention, especially with the republishing of his legendary 1986 photobook Ravens by UK publisher Mack just this past year. This first posthumous retrospective features portrait works; a selection of Fukase’s abstract works, including Hibi, where he applied paint to photographs; his influential Bero Bero series; as well as never-seen images from positives newly restored by the Director of the Masahisa Fukase Archives, Tomo Kosuga.
Masahisa Fukase
Born in 1934, Hokkaido, Japan. Died in 2012, Tokyo, Japan. Immersed in photography from his earliest days—his father had a portrait studio—Masahisa Fukase began as a documentary photographer for magazines before developing his own profoundly introspective oeuvre. In 1992 Fukase suffered an accident that kept him in intensive care until his death in 2012. His 1986 book Karasu (Ravens), in which the dark birds are a metaphor of his solitude since his former wife left him, was universally acclaimed. Masahisa Fukase’s work was a great success in the United States and in Europe. His work was shown in the West for the first time in 1974, in New York, as part of MoMA’s historic New Japanese Photography exhibition, and has since been exhibited in exhibitions all over the world. He has published many important books including Family (1991), Memories of Father (1991) and Bukubuku (2004).
Kondaya Genbei Chikuin-no-Ma
Kondaya, Nishigawa, Sanjo-sagaru, Muromachi-dori, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, 604-8165
Subway Karasuma Line or Tozai Line ”Karasuma Oike” station. 4 min on foot from exit 6

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