Prince Gyasi, Responsibility II, 2018, Fujiflex print
Prince Gyasi, The Last One, 2020, Fujiflex print
Prince Gyasi, Take me home, 2018, Fujiflex print
9-a

Prince Gyasi

プリンス・ジャスィ

The Truth of Color

Supported by Cheerio Corporation Co., LTD.

ASPHODEL

Prince Gyasi (Nyantakyi) is a 23 year old Ghanaian creative and visual artist. Prince creates images that are bold, hopeful, and tell the stories of marginalized individuals who are often pushed aside in society. Most of his images are created in his hometown of Accra, using the surrounding landscapes and community as his muse. Each hyper colorful print reveals fundamental human emotions that are tied in with a person’s life, such as fatherhood, motherhood or childhood. Using his iPhone, Prince captures both resiliency and strength through his striking silhouettes placed against brightly altered landscapes and vivid backgrounds. His art showcases the nobility and grace of black skin, offering viewers a counter-narrative to dominant notions of beauty. Using his cellphone, Price Gyasi breaks artistic conventions and questions the elitism found in art. Having an immense amount of talent, drive and inspiration from his early beginnings in photography, he realized he could use his phone as a serious creation tool and as a means of expression. In addition to being a professional artist, he is the co-founder of BoxedKids, the title referring to “kids who are trapped in a place or situation,” which helps underprivileged children from Jamestown, Accra.

ASPHODEL

11:00 - 19:00

Admission accepted 30 mins before the venue closes.

Adult: ¥800
Students: ¥600 (Please present your student ID)

Closed: 4/13, 4/20, 4/27

ASPHODEL

99-10, Sueyoshi-cho, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto

Keihan Line “Gion-shijo” station. 3 min on foot from Exit 7
Hankyu Line “Kyoto Kawaramachi” station. 5 min on foot from Exit 1

プリンス・ジャスィ

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